Reproductive Rights Are Worker Rights

We vote to protect our fundamental freedoms like reproductive health care and the right to join a union. Elections matter—did politicians in your state protect or take away your freedoms?

Click your state to learn more. Or switch between the different worker laws using the map key.

Last Updated 01/24/2023

 
 

Alabama

Current Law

On June 24, 2022, hours after the Dobbs ruling, a U.S. district court lifted an injunction on the state’s 2019 law banning abortion. The law makes it a felony to perform an abortion at any stage of pregnancy with no exceptions for rape or incest, with a penalty of up to 99 years in prison. There is an exception in cases where the woman’s health is at serious risk. 

State Actors

The Jefferson County district attorney signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health, joining a list of nearly 90 elected prosecutors from 29 states. 

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1953).
  • Did not expand Medicaid coverage.
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.
     

Alaska

Current Law

The state Supreme Court has interpreted the right to privacy in the state constitution as encompassing abortion rights.

Labor Issues
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
     

Arizona

Current Law

The law before Dobbs banned abortions after 22 weeks of pregnancy. On Sept. 23, 2022, a judge ruled that the state can enforce banning abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

State Actors

A federal judge blocked the state’s “personhood” abortion law, which would have granted all legal rights to fertilized eggs or fetuses and could have been used to charge providers with assault, child abuse or other crimes.

The attorney general has publicly stated that a pre-statehood law declaring that anyone who facilitates a procedure that causes a miscarriage or abortion can face a prison sentence between two to five years is now in effect and effectively would ban abortion in the state. A federal judge had previously thrown out a portion of the law that would allow a ban on abortions because of a fetal genetic abnormality.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1946).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Arkansas

Current Law

A “trigger ban” enacted in 2019 went into effect following Dobbs. Abortions are banned with the exception of when the procedure is needed to protect the life of the patient in a medical emergency.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1944).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

California

Current Law

Abortion is legal until viability, generally considered to be around 24 weeks.

Colorado

Current Law

Colorado’s Reproductive Health Equity Act declares fundamental rights to abortions at any stage of pregnancy.

Connecticut

Current Law

Abortion is legal in Connecticut until viability, generally considered to be around 24 weeks.

Delaware

Current Law

Abortion is legal in Delaware until viability, generally considered to be around 24 weeks.

District of Columbia

Current Law

Abortion is legal at all stages of pregnancy. 

In 2017, the District of Columbia City Council passed a law that made it illegal to discriminate against health care professionals who provide or publicly support abortions.

Expected Changes

The U.S. Congress has oversight of D.C.’s laws due to its lack of statehood, and therefore has the authority to introduce legislation to restrict access to reproductive health care in the District if it is not federally protected. For example, the Dornan Amendment prevents abortion care services from being funded by Medicare. 

Florida

Current Law

A 15-week abortion ban law went into effect July 1, 2022. Exemptions are available if the procedure is necessary to save the pregnant woman’s life, prevent serious injury or if the fetus has a fatal abnormality. No exemptions for pregnancies caused by rape, incest or human trafficking.

Expected Changes

Seven Florida clergy members filed lawsuits against the 15-week ban, arguing the ban violates religious freedom. The lawsuits are ongoing and expected to eventually reach the state Supreme Court.

State Actors

The governor removed Hillsborough County State Attorney Andrew Warren (13th Judicial Circuit, Tampa) for pledging not to prosecute people receiving an abortion or their doctors performing them.

Leon County Circuit Court Judge John Cooper approved a temporary restraining order blocking the 15-week ban on abortions the day before the law was enacted. The state appealed the injunction less than an hour after it had taken effect.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1944).
  • Did not expand Medicaid coverage.
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Georgia

Current Law

A federal appeals court overturned a lower court ruling to allow a 2019 abortion law to take effect on July 20, 2022. The law bans most abortions once a “detectable human heartbeat” is present. The law includes exceptions for rape and incest, as long as a police report is filed, and exceptions for when a patient’s life is at risk or a serious medical condition renders a fetus unviable.

Expected Changes

Republican lawmakers are likely to introduce more restrictive legislation when they return for their annual session in January 2023. 

State Actors

District attorneys in DeKalb, Douglas and Chatham counties (Savannah), and the judicial circuits for Gwinnett, Macon, Western and Augusta signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1947).
  • Did not expand Medicaid coverage.
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.

Hawaii

Current Law

In 1970, Hawaii became the first state in the United States to decriminalize abortion, making it legal until viability. After viability, there are exceptions for if a patient’s life or health is in danger.

Labor Issues
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Idaho

Current Law

A trigger ban on all abortions went into effect on Aug. 25, 2022. There are narrow exemptions for rape or incest. A state federal judge blocked part of the ban to eliminate a provision that would have allowed providers to be prosecuted for providing abortion services in an emergency medical situation. 

The state’s Supreme Court upheld the state’s ban on abortion care in a ruling on Jan. 5, 2023, ruling that the State Constitution does not include a right to abortion care.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1985).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.

Illinois

Current Law

Abortion is legal to the point of viability and after viability in order to protect the patient’s life or health.

A new law was passed in January of 2023 that establishes legal protections for health care providers sanctioned in other states for performing abortion care within the state of Illinois.

Labor Issues
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Indiana

Current Law

A near-total ban on abortion that was signed by the governor on Aug. 15, 2022 ,and that went into effect on Sept. 15, 2022, is currently blocked by a preliminary injunction against the ban. 

State Actors

The Marion County (Indianapolis) district attorney signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 2012).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.

Iowa

Current Law

There is a 24-hour waiting period before receiving an abortion and the individual is required to receive state-directed counseling that includes information designed to discourage abortions. Abortion is legal up to 22 weeks.

The Iowa Supreme Court issued a ruling that reversed a previous decision to eliminate the state constitutional right to an abortion on June 17, 2022.

Expected Changes

The governor asked the state courts to reverse earlier decisions following the Dobbs and Iowa Supreme Court decisions, and has stated she will wait for the courts to act on her request to reverse previous rulings before proposing additional restrictions.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1947).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Kansas

Current Law

Abortions are legal up to 22 weeks, and after 22 weeks to save a patient’s life or to prevent “a substantial and irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function.”

In 2019, the Kansas Supreme Court ruled that the state’s constitution protects a woman’s right to an abortion. 

Kansas voters rejected a proposed constitutional amendment on Aug. 2, 2022, that would have given lawmakers the authority to restrict or ban abortion.

State Actors

The Douglas County (Lawrence) district attorney signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1958).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.

Kentucky

Current Law

On July 22, 2022, a Louisville judge issued an injunction blocking the state’s near-total abortion trigger ban that was passed in 2019 and does not provide exceptions for rape or incest.

State Actors

Attorney General Daniel Cameron asked the state’s Supreme Court to reinstate the trigger law on July 3, 2022.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 2017).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Louisiana

Current Law

The state’s trigger ban has taken effect and been blocked multiple times, and is currently in effect after an appeals court ruling on July 29, 2022. The ban prohibits all abortions except for “medically futile” pregnancies in cases of fetuses with fatal abnormalities. The ban does not have exceptions for rape or incest. The state’s Supreme Court rejected an appeal to block the law for the third time on Aug. 12, 2022. 

State Actors

State Attorney General Jeff Landry pledged to take immediate legal action against any obstacles in the way of enforcing abortion laws.

The Orleans Parish district attorney signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1976).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.

Maine

Current Law

Abortions are legal until viability and after viability if the health or life of the patient is at risk, or if the pregnancy is no longer viable. 

State Actors

The governor signed an executive order that bars state agencies from cooperating with other states’ abortion investigations and would deny extradition attempts.

The district attorney from Prosecutorial District Number 6 signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Labor Issues
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Maryland

Current Law

A 1991 law prohibits restrictions to abortion prior to viability. Abortion is legal after viability if the health or life of the patient is at risk, or is the pregnancy is no longer viable. 

State Actors

During the 2022 legislative session, the legislature overrode the governor’s veto of a law that expands abortion access by ending a restriction that only physicians can provide them and requiring most insurance plans to cover abortion care without cost. 

The Prince George’s County and Baltimore City district attorneys signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Massachusetts

Current Law

Abortions are legal up to 24 weeks and in cases where the child would not survive after birth. Patients can seek abortions without consent from a parent or guardian at age 16.

State Actors

The governor signed an executive order on 6/24/22 that bars state agencies from assisting another state’s investigation into people or businesses for receiving or delivering reproductive health services that are legal in the state.

The Massachusetts attorney general, and district attorneys from Berkshire, Middlesex and Norfolk counties and Northwestern District, signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Michigan

Current Law

Abortion remains legal in Michigan after a state judge issued a preliminary injunction blocking immediate enforcement of a 1931 law banning nearly all abortions. 

Voters in the state passed Proposal 3 on Nov. 8, 2022 that created a state constitutional right to reproductive freedom. The measure defined the right as the right for individuals to make all decisions about pregnancy, including prenatal care, childbirth, postpartum care, contraception, sterilization, abortion, miscarriage management, and infertility. 

Expected Changes

Legislation has been introduced in the 2023 session that would repeal the state’s 1931 law banning nearly all abortions.

State Actors

State Attorney General Dana Nessel vowed not to enforce the state’s 1931 near-total abortion ban.

The state attorney general and prosecuting attorneys from Genesee, Ingham (Lansing), Marquette, Oakland and Washtenaw counties (Ann Arbor) signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Kent County Prosecutor Chris Becker and Jackson County Prosecutor Jerard Jarzynka stated they will continue to enforce the 1931 law, despite the injunction.

The state Court of Appeals ruled on Aug. 1, 2022, that the injunction of the 1931 abortion ban does not apply to county prosecutors. The governor filed a request for a temporary restraining order against enforcement and the request was granted by Oakland County Judge Jacob James Cunningham. 

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 2013).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Minnesota

Current Law

A 1995 State Supreme Court ruling found that the state constitution protects abortion rights. Abortions are legal up to the point of viability, typically 24 weeks.

A state judge increased access to abortion care by eliminating certain restrictions, including a 24-hour waiting period and parental notification requirements, on July 11, 2022.

State Actors

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison said July 28, 2022, that he wouldn’t appeal the state district court decision on the grounds that doing so would be costly and likely unsuccessful. 

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison and a Ramsey County attorney signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Labor Issues
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Mississippi

Current Law

A trigger law passed in 2007 is in effect and allows abortions only if a patient’s life is in danger or if a pregnancy was caused by a rape that was reported to law enforcement. There is no current pending litigation against the trigger law.

State Actors

District attorneys from the 6th Judicial Circuit and Hinds County signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1954).
  • Did not expand Medicaid coverage.
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.

Missouri

Current Law

A 2019 trigger ban on most abortions went into effect that makes abortions illegal “except in cases of medical emergency.” There are no exemptions for rape or incest, and performing abortions is punishable by five to 15 years in prison.

State Actors

The St. Louis County district attorney signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt filed a lawsuit on July 21, 2022, to block a St. Louis bill that allocated $1 million in American Rescue Plan Act funding to help people travel out of state for abortions, arguing that it violates state law.

Labor Issues
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Montana

Current Law

Abortion is legal until viability, or about 24 weeks of pregnancy. 

The right to abortion care is protected by Armstrong v. State (1999), that found the state constitution’s right to privacy guarantees access to abortion.

Expected Changes

A 2021 law would make abortions illegal after 20 weeks and a law that would require chemical abortions to be done with in-person medical supervision will be heard by the state’s Supreme Court. A district court judge temporarily blocked enforcement of the law in October 2021 while challenges move through the courts, and the state’s Supreme Court upheld the ruling on Aug. 9, 2022. 

The Montana Legislature passed a ballot measure for the 2022 November elections to ask voters whether they support a state law to require abortion providers to give lifesaving treatment to a fetus that is born alive. 

State Actors

The governor filed a motion urging the state’s Supreme Court to accept new briefings from the public and to revisit its ruling in Armstrong v. State.

Attorney General Austin Knudsen filed a brief with the state’s Supreme Court to overturn Armstrong v. State.

Labor Issues
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Nebraska

Current Law

Abortion is legal up to 20 weeks of pregnancy. There is a 24-hour waiting period before receiving an abortion, and the individual is required to receive state-directed counseling that includes information designed to discourage abortions. People younger than 19 must have parental consent to undergo an abortion.

State Actors

The governor announced on Aug. 8, 2022, that he will not be calling for a special session as there are not enough votes to pass further restrictions on abortion. The governor supports a near-total ban with no exceptions for rape or incest. 

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1946).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Nevada

Current Law

In 1990, voters passed a referendum that codified the right to abortion in the state constitution. Abortions are legal until 24 weeks, and after to preserve the life or health of the patient. It would take a statewide vote to change or repeal the law. 

State Actors

The governor signed an executive order to protect those seeking or providing abortion services or other reproductive health care in the state.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1952).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

New Hampshire

Current Law

Abortion is legal up to 24 weeks of pregnancy. Abortion is legal after 24 weeks to protect the life or health of the patient or in cases where the fetus has been diagnosed with “abnormalities incompatible with life.”

Labor Issues
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since Sept. 1, 2008.

New Jersey

Current Law

Abortion is legal at all stages of pregnancy.

The governor signed two bills into law that aim to protect the right to abortion for out-of-state residents and bar extradition. The governor also signed a state budget that includes $45 million to expand family planning and abortion services, and security upgrades for clinics. 

State Actors

Acting Attorney General Matthew Platkin and U.S. Attorney Philip Sellinger of New Jersey announced a partnership to share intelligence about threats to clinics and patients seeking reproductive care on July 20, 2022, including threats involving offenders in New Jersey and out of state.

New Mexico

Current Law

Abortion is legal at all stages of pregnancy. However, the New Mexico courts have not determined whether the state constitution protects the right to abortion.

State Actors

The governor signed an executive order to block providers in the state from being punished in other states for providing abortions to residents of other states and bar extradition attempts.

District attorneys from the 1st Judicial Circuit and Bernalillo County (Albuquerque) signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Labor Issues
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

New York

Current Law

Abortion is legal within the first 24 weeks of pregnancy or to preserve the patient’s life. 

The 2019 Reproductive Health Act codified Roe v. Wade into law, removed abortion from the state’s criminal code, and allowed abortions after 24 weeks if a fetus isn’t viable or to protect the patient’s life or health.

North Carolina

Current Law

Abortions are legal until viability or after viability due to a “medical emergency,” during which the patient would die or face a “serious risk” of substantial and irreversible physical impairment.

State Actors

District attorneys in Buncombe (Asheville) and Durham counties signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Expected Changes

A 1973 law that banned most abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy was struck down by federal judges as unconstitutional in 2019 and 2021. A 2016 amendment to state abortion law would have banned abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy. A district court judge has the ability to reopen the case and lift the injunction. GOP leaders in the General Assembly have asked the court to allow them to file a motion to allow the law to go into effect.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1947).
  • Did not expand Medicaid coverage. 
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.

North Dakota

Current Law

Abortion is legal before 20 weeks and after 20 weeks in cases of rape, incest or to protect the life of the patient.

Expected Changes

A 2007 trigger law makes it a felony to perform an abortion unless necessary to prevent the pregnant woman’s death or in cases of rape or incest, punishable by a five-year prison sentence and a $10,000 fine. The state’s sole abortion clinic filed a lawsuit in early July, and a judge placed a temporary restraining order on the ban; that ruling was upheld in August and again on Sept. 23, 2022

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1948).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.

Ohio

Current Law

Abortions are legal up to 20 weeks. A Hamilton County judge issued a 14-day restraining order against the trigger law that would ban abortions after the first detectable fetal cardiac activity, except when the patient’s life is threatened or their health is at significant risk. On Sept. 20, the same judge indicated that he would extend the temporary restraining order to Oct. 12, 2022. 

The state’s Supreme Court denied a motion for an emergency stay on the ban on July 1, 2022.

State Actors

Attorney General Dave Yost asked a federal court to lift an injunction on the abortion ban, which it did later the same day. He also asked the state’s Supreme Court to dismiss a challenge to the abortion ban.

A Columbus city attorney pledged not to pursue criminal charges against those who seek abortions or assist in providing them.

The Cuyahoga County (Cleveland) district attorney signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Labor Issues
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Oklahoma

Current Law

Abortions are legal only to protect the life of the patient. The law is enforced through civil lawsuits rather than criminal charges.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 2001).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.

Oregon

Current Law

Abortion is legal at all stages of pregnancy.

State Actors
  • Democratic lawmakers formed the Reproductive Health and Access to Care Work Group about two weeks after the leaked Supreme Court majority opinion to craft recommendations for the 2023 legislative session.
  • District attorneys from Deschutes, Hood River, Multnomah (Portland) and Wasco counties signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Pennsylvania

Current Law

Abortions are legal up to 24 weeks and after 24 weeks only if the patient’s life or health is endangered.

Expected Changes

The legislature is advancing a proposal to amend the state constitution to declare there is no constitutional right to an abortion or to public funding for an abortion. The proposal was passed on July 8, 2022, and must pass the legislature again during the 2023 legislative session in order for it to be placed before voters, which could happen as early as May 2023.

State Actors

The governor is suing the General Assembly for its passage of the ballot measure. District attorneys from Philadelphia and Delaware County signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Labor Issues
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.

Puerto Rico

Current Law

Abortion is legal at all stages of pregnancy.

State Actors

The governor vetoed a bill that would have required pregnant individuals younger than 18 to receive consent from their parents or legal guardians before obtaining abortion care.

Rhode Island

Current Law

Abortion is legal until viability or after to protect the health or life of the patient. 

A 2019 law prohibits the state from restricting abortion prior to fetal viability or after if it is necessary to protect the health or life of the patient.

State Actors

The governor signed an executive order to prohibit state agencies from cooperating with other states’ investigations into people who travel to the state for reproductive health care and for health care providers who perform abortions.

South Carolina

Current Law

Abortion is legal up to 20 weeks, and after to protect the life of the patient or in cases of fetal anamolies. 

Expected Changes

The state’s Supreme Court issued a ruling on Jan. 5, 2023, that a state law banning abortion care after a fetal cardiac heartbeat is detectable was unconstitutional because it violated a right to privacy.

On Sept. 8, 2022, the state Senate refused to pass a bill that would outlaw abortion after fertilization, with some exceptions. Unable to pass the restrictive bill, legislators instead took up an amendment that struck the bill’s language and inserted language to change the state’s existing six-week ban on abortion. That ban has been blocked by the South Carolina Supreme Court. As a state court continues to review that law, the state’s 2016 law that bans abortions 20 weeks after conception is currently in effect.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1954).
  • Did not expand Medicaid coverage.
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.

South Dakota

Current Law

A trigger law banned all abortion in the state except to save the life of a pregnant woman. 

The governor signed HB 1318 in March 2022 that prohibits physicians from prescribing abortion medications using telemedicine.

Expected Changes

Possible legislative action in 2023 aimed at making it more difficult to obtain abortion care in other states and prohibiting organizations from helping patients travel out of state to receive an abortion.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1947).
  • Did not expand Medicaid coverage.
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Tennessee

Current Law

A 2019 trigger ban went into effect on Aug. 25, 2022. The law bans all abortions in the state and makes providing abortion treatments a felony. Abortions are only allowed to prevent the death of the patient or prevent serious risk of impairment of major bodily functions. 

A 2014 ballot measure constitutional amendment declared that the state’s constitution does not protect or secure the right to abortion or require it to be funded.

State Actors

The Nashville district attorney signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1947).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Texas

Current Law

A 2021 trigger ban went into effect on Aug. 25, 2022. The law makes performing abortions a second-degree felony and is punishable by a fine of at least $100,000 for each offense. There are no exceptions for rape or incest. There is an exception if the patient’s life is threatened or their health is at significant risk.

Expected Changes

A Harris County district court judge issued a stay on a 1925 law that would prohibit all abortions in the state, punishable by up to five years in prison. Under this temporary order, abortions up to six weeks were able to resume in the state at some clinics.

State Actors

Attorney General Ken Paxton asked the state’s Supreme Court to issue an immediate stay of the restraining order blocking enforcement of the 1925 trigger law.

District attorneys in Bexar (San Antonio), Dallas, Fort Bend, Nueces (Corpus Christi) and Travis (Austin) counties signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1947).
  • Did not expand Medicaid coverage.
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.

Utah

Current Law

Abortion is legal up to 18 weeks except in cases of rape and incest if reported to law enforcement, and if there’s a serious risk to the life or health of the patient, as well as confirmed lethal birth defects.

Expected Changes

A district court judge issued a preliminary injunction against a trigger law that bans nearly all abortions and will remain in place until the lawsuit is settled. The ban would include exemptions for rape, incest and serious health risks for the patient. The case most likely will reach the state’s Supreme Court.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1955).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.

Vermont

Current Law

Abortion is legal at all stages of pregnancy.

Expected Changes

Voters in the state passed a ballot measure on Nov. 8, 2022 that enshrines the right to personal reproductive autonomy in the state's constitution. 

Labor Issues
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Virginia

Current Law

Abortion is legal up to the end of the second trimester of a pregnancy, around 26 weeks. Virginia law does not include express constitutional or statutory protections for abortion.

State Actors

The governor announced on June 24, 2022, that he will seek to ban most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

District attorneys from Arlington, Fairfax, Henrico and Loudoun counties, and Alexandria, Charlottesville, Falls Church, Norfolk, Richmond and Portsmouth, signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1947).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Washington

Current Law

Abortion is legal until viability, and after in cases where the patent’s health or life is threatened.

State Actors

The governor issued a directive barring the Washington State Patrol from cooperating with other states’ investigations related to abortions.

West Virginia

Current Law

The governor signed a bill on Sept. 16, 2022, that banned nearly all abortions in the state, with narrow exemptions for life-threatening complications and in cases of rape or incest if they are reported to law enforcement. Under the new law, criminal penalties for providers take effect 90 days after passage. The law also prohibits the use of telemedicine to prescribe abortion-inducing medication.

For anyone seeking an abortion there is a 24-hour waiting period, required counseling to discourage abortion and parental permission required for minors. There is also a ban on the use of telemedicine to administer a medication abortion and a prohibition of abortions on the grounds that the child will be born with a disability.

State Actors

A county circuit judge granted an injunction to temporarily block an 1849 abortion ban from taking effect. The law would make providing abortion services a felony punishable by three to 10 years in prison.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 2016).
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since Jan. 1, 2016.

Wisconsin

Current Law

Abortion clinics have stopped performing the procedure in the state under an 1849 law that banned all abortions, except in cases to save the life of the patient. (Before, abortion was legal until 20 weeks, and after to save the life of the patient.)

Expected Changes

A 1849 law banned abortions except to save a patient’s life and makes providing abortion services a felony. At the direction of the governor, Attorney General Josh Kaul filed a lawsuit in Dane County Circuit Court seeking to block the state’s 173-year-old abortion ban, and the lawsuit remains pending.

State Actors

The Milwaukee County district attorney signed on to a joint statement to not use resources to criminalize reproductive health.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 2015).
  • Did not expand Medicaid coverage.
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.

Wyoming

Current Law

Abortions are legal until viability.

State Actors

A district court judge placed a temporary injunction on a trigger law that was signed into law in March 2020. The law bans all abortions except in cases of rape or incest, or to protect the mother’s life or health.

Labor Issues
  • Is a “right to work” state (since 1963).
  • Did not expand Medicaid coverage.
  • No statewide paid family and medical leave law.
  • Has not increased the state minimum wage since July 24, 2009.

*No Min. Wage Increase in map key means the state has not increased the minimum wage since 2009.

** No Family/Medical Leave means there is no statewide family leave.